almost passive house : 2941 east 5th avenue

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designed by : lanefab

built by : stone creek construction in 2015 [listed for 1.85mil]

check out more about this house and passive house in the news.

here is a short description of the house from it’s own feature website :

Own one of Vancouver’s most efficient and comfortable homes. Built using German ‘Passivhaus’ energy efficiency techniques, this home features super-insulated walls and triple glazed windows – creating a new level of comfort year round. Save money every month on utilities, while gaining comfort and contributing to a healthier environment and climate.

Become the owner of this special home, and become a leader in your community. This is the first detached Passive Solar House built in British Columbia to be available on the market to purchase.

Though built to Passive House principles*, this home does offer a radiant heating system. This leading construction design is seen all over the world – including many cold, wet, harsh climates. These homes do not require a primary heating source at all, nor do we expect you to need/use one here. However, given it is the first of its kind locally on the market, you will have the choice to turn the heat on, for peace of mind – though we’re confident daring you not to.

Enjoy Passive House comfort in style. Besides top-quality energy efficiency, this home is sleek, modern, open, and perfect for entertaining. The main floor has a large, luxury kitchen looking out to a family room, impressive dining area, and connected formal living space. With glass stairway accents, top-tier appliances, and beautifully unique wide window spaces on both the North and South side of the home, you can not only take pride in your low carbon footprint, but in your fabulous space too.

Dramatic vaulted ceilings upstairs bring a serious cool factor to the 3 large bedrooms + den/office. The master suite offers an exceptional view of the North Shore mountains, modern built-in storage solutions, and a pretty, spa-inspired ensuite.

This home offers a versatile basement with a large flex room, complete with full bathroom. Easily enjoyed by either the primary residence or basement tenants, it makes an ideal media room or even a second master suite. The kitchen below is roughed in, and can be installed at the buyer’s discretion.

E5th Plans - Basement

E5th Plans - Main

E5th Plans - Upper

thick walls are sexy #thickwallsaresexy and this house implements 17″ thick walls

IMG_2502the living space next to the entry.

f4829836400d04300af794ccdbdc7846the view from the living room.

IMG_2524kitchen features symmetrical cabinet design.

IMG_2605family room at back of house.

IMG_2613bedroom at front of house.

IMG_2633master bedroom at back of house has mountain views.

 

the laneway house:

ff9c88830fb04fe6611669031fbc062cthe laneway house features a sunken entry at internal yard side.

E5th Plans - LWH Lower

E5th Plans - LWH Upper

0dd785436d947333a5f3a9f1a325aa4dopen living space on upper floor of laneway house.

awards : georgies 2014

another round of georgie finalists & winners has been announced. take a look at all the winners here. (thumbnails would go a long way on their website)

after sifting through all the contenders, i feel worn out, but here is my list of worthy mentions:

the nookian housewinner – best single family detached home up to 2,000 sq.ft. under $500,000
the nookian house – naikoon contracting
check out the listing (2211 larson crescent, north vancouver here & here and video here) coldstream residencefinalist – custom home valued under $750,000
the coldstream residence – keith dahlen construction ltd.d’arcy jones architecture inc. oak bayfinalist – custom home valued under $750,000
oak bay – frits de vries architect ltd.

fir tree glenfinalist – custom home valued between $750,000 – $1,500,000
fir tree glen – horizon pacific contracting & sunrooms inc.

deep cove contemporary finalist – best residential renovation $100,000 – $299,999
deep cove contemporary – vision built construction ltd.d’arcy jones architecture inc.

vancouver specialized finalist – best residential renovation over $800,000
vancouver specialized – vision built construction ltd.d’arcy jones architecture inc.
(no, this is not a typo… seems like there are only a few cats out there doing remarkable work …)

blaine housefinalist – best single family kitchen under $100,000
blaine house – kalu interiors

union street eco heritagefinalist – best innovative certified home – production or custom
union street eco heritage – natural balance home buildersshape architecture
also featured in canadian architect here.

well there you have it. after all, there were some shiny gems found.

the vancouver house, is coming

darn squirrels, they get into everything!
http://vancouverhouse.ca/
some of the plans are hilarious, especially at the lower floors where you are surrounded by columns in the most peculiar of places:
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nothing says welcome home like walking straight into a column.

2014_08_19_04_44_40_vancouverhouse_908
where do you put furniture in this place?

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those are some behemoth columns, right in the bedroom. some places there is no room to get around the bed!
don’t get me wrong, once you get past some of these plans, there are some very nice layouts further up on the building, though it still surprises me that all these units are sold, only $1000/sq.ft. <sarcasm>

DRKdesign awarded houzz badge

badge_13_8
awarded on January 30, 2014

DRKdesign is awarded best of Houzz 2014 for client satisfaction.
this award is in recognition of the highest level for client satisfaction by the Houzz community.

thank you to all who have continued their support and we look forward to many years of providing clients with unparallelled service and ingenious designs.

DRKdesign’s Houzz profile page

Houzz article : 11 things to expect with your remodel

written by

If you’ve never remodeled before or are taking on a big project, you may feel a little nervous.How much will it cost?How long will it take? Between the large expense and the excitement of anticipating your finished remodel, it’s hard not to feel a little apprehensive. Knowing what to expect can help allay your fears and make you better prepared for what’s to come.

by Ventana Construction LLC

by Ventana Construction LLC

1. Dust. Even with elaborate ZipWalls, a fine layer of dust can gather in parts of your home far from construction. There are a few ways to control it. If you can, close off the construction area from the rest of your house with a compression-fit temporary wall. Running air filtering systems called air handlers can also pull the dust from the air on the nonconstruction side of the house. Heat the house without your furnace if possible, or completely block the warm-air and cold-air returns in the construction area. If you don’t, you’ll just be pulling dust from that section of the house into the part where you’re living. Consult an HVAC company before blocking ducts to make sure your furnace will still work effectively.

2. Noise. It will be incessant. Whining saws, scratching Sheetrock sanders and thumping nail guns followed by bellowing compressors: in short, little peace or quiet. Find another place to nap and don’t count on working from home unless your home office is far away from the construction zone. If you’re sure it couldn’t possibly be that bad, visit someone else’s home under construction and you’ll see.

Traditional Kitchen by Mueller Nicholls Cabinets and Construction

by Mueller Nicholls Cabinets and Construction

3. Triumphant highs. For you it may be the demolition of the ugly vinyl floors in your kitchen. For others it may be the installation of the carefully selected backsplash tile. Others still may feel elated only when they see Sheetrock go in or get to relax when their project is completely done.

4. Multiple sighs. It may be that you just want to be done, or that you’re tired of answering so many questions and writing so many checks. Or you may just be tired of having so many people in your house. Hang in there — remodeling fatigue will be short lived when you get to move back into your newly remodeled space.

by Ventana Construction LLC

by Ventana Construction LLC

5. The unexpected. If you expect anything, expect this. Asbestos, irregular framing, jerry-rigged wiring, funny plumbing and more unexpected surprises are bound to arise. No, you won’t be laughing, and neither will your contractor. Count on finding something no one could have anticipated in your budget and your time frame, and you will be well prepared when it happens.

Rustic Bathroom by John K. Anderson Design

by John K. Anderson Design

6. Change orders. The unexpected’s cousin is the change order, by which any new and changed work is documented, along with added or reduced cost. Change orders can also be used to resolve allowances, which are placeholders in the budget for particular items. But most often change orders occur because of things that clients decide to add or change. When you absolutely positively have to have that Italian tile, you can bet a change order is on the way.

7. Cash concerns. Even if your project is right on budget, the sheer amount of money you are spending may cause a bit of a freakout. If you’re used to writing four-digit checks, you can easily be writing checks with one or two more zeros during a large remodel. If costs are increasing, along with change orders, it could increase your anxiety. Having cash on hand that’s a bare minimum of 10 percent above contract for contingencies will help alleviate that stress. Have 20 percent if you want to worry less.

8. Delays. Snow falls, people get sick, cars break down and sometimes faucets ordered from the factory take 10 weeks instead of six. You and your contractor will likely be working from a schedule that assumes the world is a perfect place. It’s not, and knowing that will allow you to be resilient when your schedule shifts a bit.

9. Decisions. Where should that outlet be? How high do you want the showerhead? Where do you want the cabinet hardware mounted? Oil-rubbed bronze or chrome or brushed nickel or satin nickel? Is your head spinning yet? Count on hundreds of questions that you’ll need to answer as your project proceeds, or select your architect as your proxy. Just know that your selection of a contractor is the first of many you will make.

10. Outliers. At the end of your project, expect one or two punch-list items that will take longer to resolve than anything else. It may be a light fixture that arrives broken or the very last two pieces of tile. The important thing is to get the final details right, even if they take a little longer.

11. A party! Expect that you will want to show off your newly remodeled kitchen, living room or addition. We have had clients throw parties and invite friends, along with us and our trade partners. It’s gratifying for everyone to see a beautifully finished home filled with people enjoying themselves.

Tell us: What have you learned from your latest remodel?

out of town goodie : revelstoke modern

revelstoke - housea great article in the globe and mail has been written by trevor boddy about a modern house designed by battersby howat in revelstoke :

A home to revel in

Maybe alpine air inspires architects to do their best.

Revelstoke – a railway and highway service centre quickly transforming into a mountain mega-resort – has an unusually high ratio of B.C.’s finest buildings. The West Kootenay town of 8,000 has two superior examples of architecture that I would put on my personal Top 10 list for B.C.’s Interior, which is two more listings than I would give Kelowna, 15-times its size.

My two faves are its 1912 neoclassical courthouse with a glittering metallic dome, plus the 1939 Revelstoke hybrid city hall-cum-fire hall, in my view the first fully modern-style public building in the province.

Now adding to Revelstoke’s architectural acclaim is one of the best single-family B.C. houses I have seen this year.

To be honest, shelter magazines and a regular column like mine are guilty of over-praising multimillion dollar trophy houses, even though few will be remembered when the money runs out. But, like Revelstoke’s authoritatively composed courthouse and crisply optimistic civic complex, the riverside retirement house for Dr. Geoff and Gwynne Battersby is modest in scale – two bedrooms and living spaces on 1,650 square feet, plus finished basement – but every tuck and flourish is there for a reason.

Good design moves here begin with the house’s siting on a small, west-facing lot on the geologically active banks of the surging Columbia River. The rectangular house has its long side facing the setting sun – so rectangular and modest in scale that a local joked, “Oh, you mean that fancy trailer?” when directing me to “Doc Battersby’s new place.” Indeed, across the river are trailers, and across the street are stuccoed former motel units with the same logical one-way slope away from the river. The simple reality is that shifting sandy soils and a sometimes-torrential river means snow shed off roofs needs to be deposited as far as possible from the Columbia’s changeable banks.

revelstoke - front yardThe trailer jibe may also have to do with the fact the Battersby house – co-designed by their Vancouver-based son David – is more metallic than woodsy, in sharp contrast to the loggy mock-Whistler houses newly arrived in town along with such other symptoms of resort mania as cedar-shake roofs – both less functional and more expensive than metal cappings. The David Battersby and Heather Howat design makes innovative use of a local vernacular building design element appropriate to this extreme snow zone town – standing seam metal roofs – then situates this material in an unexpected way.

revelstoke - entryThe Battersby house extends this Revelstoke metal roof vernacular, but more eye-catching is the use of the same zinc-coloured material on facade portions along both alley and river sides, making for no-maintenance, storm- and snow-resisting faces. Metal wraps the house, with angled bulges on the alley side balanced by that fearless vertical face on the river, with clear-stain red cedar boards warming more sheltered and high contact areas. Similarly, snow-resistant strains of Karl Forster tall grass and B.C. dogwood are set down in the house’s near-perfect rock garden. Gazing at it during our house tour, Gwynne noted “All those nice young people in the architectural office gave us the plants for the garden they designed – aren’t they lovely?”

revelstoke - fireplaceEqually lovely are the livable spaces and considered floor-plan her son and his Vancouver colleagues concocted. No grand flourishes here, the Battersby-Howat design intelligently puts a bedroom with a butt-jointed corner window at each end, with living-dining and a galley kitchen in the middle, all focus on the Danish Modern furniture and the stunning view of Mount Begbie out the window.

revelstoke - bedroomIt is almost as if David Battersby synthesized the architectural essences of the courthouse and city hall he knew so well – metal wrap from the former, clean modern lines from the latter – then applied them to his own design. “Revelstoke has a huge amount of snow shedding – last year it was 12 feet deep on the driveway,” explains David Battersby of the town where his family has resided since 1968. “We designed it so that snow could pile up in places on the alley and river sides, leaving the corner views and windows clear.”

revelstoke - detailThe questioning of distinctions between wall and roof has emerged as a major theme in leading-edge architecture this decade, but too often this means angled and curving sections worthy of the futuroid rooms in old Jetson’s cartoons, or more earthily, the Flintstones’ Cro-Magnon rock-warrens. Neither Space Age nor Stone Age, Battersby-Howat’s fluidity of angled alley wall into sloping roof into roofing used vertically on the river side is as smart as it is seductive.

revelstoke - side of houseA house for one’s parents is a psychologically-wrought task for many architects, and clan-linked commissions were the first to be actually built by such intellectually-inclined designers as Robert Venturi, Peter Eisenman, Michael Graves and Laurinda Spears. David Battersby says of this, “I am a real sap, so doing a house for my parents was special – they really came to appreciate what Heather and I do.” This is not to say, however, that the design process was all sweetness and light. “I am my father’s son,” says David, “and there were times we butted heads, but my much mellower brother Rod did both the plumbing and the go-betweening.”

revelstoke - porchWell, Doll’s Mountain Sheep butt heads in a mating ritual each fall on the alpine slopes of Mount Mackenzie above Revelstoke. A billion dollar’s worth of development on and below the slopes of this mountain will soon double the town’s population and hurl it into the leagues of Whistler and Banff. Rather than flaccidly ape those two architecturally compromised towns, I hope developers look instead for inspiration closer to home, being brave enough to revel in, then stoke the architectural fires of Revelstoke.

the house has also been featured in the cedar book 2008.

 

arthur erickson house and graden

after reading the biography on arthur erickson, some genuine curiosity ensued about the home life arthur had here in vancouver. some of you may know that his home and garden has been in the news recently due to speculation about the sale / demolition of the home.

a great read is at wallpaper magazine published in march 2013 by hadani ditmars.

an article titled ‘arthur erickson’s home faces the wrecking ball‘ ran in the globe and mail written by brent jang and dave mcginn.

link to the arthur erickson foundation.